The 29th Conference on New York State History 

June 5–7 2008 Skidmore College Saratoga Springs 

2007 Program
2006 Program

2005 Program
2004 Program
2003 Program
2002 Program


• Registration Form (pdf)
(print and mail)
• Conference Program (1.7MB pdf) 


Thursday June 5

• 9:30–3:15
Workshops 
• 3:30–5:00
Methodology Sessions
• 5:30–6:30
Tours
6:30–8:00
Dinner on your own
• 8:30
Oral History Panel 


Friday June 6

• 8:30–9:45
Early Morning Sessions
• 10:15–12:00
Late Morning Session
s
• 12:00–1:30
Lunch
Wendell Tripp Lecture 
• 1:30–2:45
Early Afternoon Sessions
• 3:15–4:30
Mid Afternoon Sessions
• 4:45–5:30
Individual Presentations
 
• 5:30 Reception
• 6:30 Dinner
• 8:00 Guest Speaker
Kevin Baker


Saturday June 7

• 8:30–9:45
Early Morning Sessions
• 10:00–11:45
Late Morning Sessions
• 11:45–1:00 Lunch
• 1:15 Ticonderoga Tour


• 2008 Conference Information
• Accommodations
• Getting There
• General Campus and City Information 
• Exhibition Hall
• In-Service Credit 


Conference Chair 
Field Horne
conference@nyhistory.net
Postal address: 
Box 215
Saratoga Springs NY 12866-0215

Conference Deputy Chair 
Edward Knoblauch
eknoblauch@nyhistory.net


2008 Conference Program Committee

• Robert Arnold, New York State Archives (retired)
• Blake Bell, Pelham Town Historian
• Kate Betz, NYSHA ex officio
• James Folts, New York State Archives
• Marla Jabbour, SUNY ESF
• Lisa Keller, Purchase College, SUNY
• Henry Mueller, Capital District BOCES
• Garet Livermore, NYSHA ex officio
• Daniel Nathan, Skidmore College
• Edythe Ann Quinn, Hartwick College
• Jenny Rosenzweig, Upstate History Alliance ex officio
• Eric Roth, Huguenot Historical Society
• John Scherer, New York State Museum
• Marilyn Van Dyke, Queensbury Town Historian
• Nicholas Westbrook, Fort Ticonderoga


Hit Counter

2008

The 29th Conference on New York State History 
June 5–7 2008 Skidmore College Saratoga Springs
Sponsored by
New York State Historical Association
In collaboration with
New York State Archives Partnership Trust 
Co-sponsored by 
New York Council for the Humanities 


Thursday June 5

9:00 AM–9:30 PM
Registration Palamountain Lobby 

9:30–3:15 Workshops 

Advance Registration Required

County/Borough Historians’ Workshop

Davis Auditorium 
Robert W. Arnold, New York State Archives (retired)
Carol Kammen, Tompkins County Historian

A forum for discussion of your positions, and a storehouse of ideas for furthering your role as mentors to the municipal historians in your counties. The morning will cover the state’s requirements and your responsibilities. Over lunch successful projects and research interests will be exchanged. In the afternoon we will focus on the complexity and use of documents in every court house, with a packet of sample materials.

Educators’ Workshop

Gannett Auditorium 
Sponsored by the Upstate History Alliance 
Building Bridges: Making Historical Records Relevant in the Classroom 
Jenny Rosenzweig, Program Coordinator Upstate History Alliance 

As New York State educators work to meet the needs of their students while simultaneously being concerned with state education standards and testing, New York’s cultural organizations are also working to develop programming and resources that will prove to be relevant in the classroom experience. 
This workshop, organized by the Upstate History Alliance, will help to bridge the gap between teachers and their community’s cultural organizations. Participants of this full day workshop will walk away with: 

• A better understanding of the New York State Standards for Education • An inside perspective from a teacher • In depth knowledge of some of the leading programs offered by New York’s cultural organizations • Hands on experience in working to develop education programs that meet needs of students, teachers, and cultural organizations This workshop is for both teachers and museum educators. Together we will work to develop meaningful educational experiences for New York’s students.

3:30–5:00 Methodology Sessions (Limited to 24 participants) 

101 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Practicum
Harder Hall 101 
• Robert Jones, Skidmore College 
Learn how to work with historic maps in new ways, manipulating them and interpreting the results to shed new light on your community’s history. 

102 Primary Sources in Teaching and Learning 
Emerson Auditorium 
• Preston E. Pierce, DHP Regional Archivist and Ontario County Historian 
A practical session for teachers and others, Dr. Pierce’s session will emphasize use of the internet to access primary resources useful in teaching New York history.

103 Using Census Manuscripts for Immigration Studies
Davis Auditorium 
• Thomas Hyder, Smithtown Central School District (retired) 
Using digital and primary resources, Mr. Hyder has developed a research project for high school American history students to do in their study of early twentieth century immigration. The focus is on the impact of immigration on local history – in this case Cortland, N.Y. 

5:30–6:30 Tours

Fees: see Registration form. Limited to 35 participants.

Walking Tour of Congress Park 
Field Horne, Conference Chair
Meet at 5:30 sharp in the Greek Revival spring pavilion near the park entrance.

Walking Tour of North Broadway 
James Kettlewell Skidmore College (emeritus)
Meet at 5:30 sharp at the college’s main gate.

6:30–8:00 Dinner on your own.

8:30 Oral History Panel 

201 Oral History Partnerships and Confluence 
Davis Auditorium 
• Philip F. Napoli, Brooklyn College CUNY
• Alison Cornyn, Picture Projects
• Sady Sullivan, Brooklyn Historical Society 
Comment: Ellen McHale, New York Folklore Society 


Friday June 6

7:30 AM–5:30 PM Registration Palamountain Lobby 
8:00 AM–5:30 PM Conference Exhibits Palamountain Lobby 

8:30–9:45 Early Morning Sessions

301 Twentieth Century Topics 
Gannett Auditorium 
HAROLD MOORE AND THE CREATION OF THE NCAA 
• Denis Brennan, Union College 
PERCEPTIONS OF CHARISMATIC AUTHORITY IN THE NEW YORK PRESS IN THE 1932 
PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 
• Devan Bissonette, SUNY Binghamton 
Comment: Daniel Nathan, Skidmore College 

302 Crime, Communities, and Incarceration 
Davis Auditorium 
THE MAGDALEN ASYLUM AND THE SOCIAL CAMPAIGN AGAINST PROSTITUTION 
• Amy Godfrey, Waubonsee Community College 
THE PRISONERS OF THE NEW YORK STATE PRISON, 17971828 
• Jonathan Nash, SUNY Albany 
Comment: Richard Hamm, SUNY Albany 

303 Welfare 
Emerson Auditorium 
“ON THE EDGE OF TOWN”: ALMSHOUSES IN WESTERN NEW YORK 
• Reid Dunlavey,  Museum of disABILITY History 
COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CARE THROUGH EARLY POLITICAL ADVOCACY 
• Edwin A. Mirand and Donald L. Trump, Roswell Park Cancer Institute 
Comment: Bonita Weddle, New York State Archives 

9:45—10:15 Break 

10:15–12:00 Late Morning Sessions

401 Immigration 
Gannett Auditorium 
ITALIAN-AMERICAN IMMIGRANT THEATRE IN NEW YORK CITY 
• Emelise Aleandri, Old-Time Italian American Music and Theatre Company 
THE MEXICAN DIASPORA IN NEW YORK CITY: HISTORICAL CHANGES IN MIGRATION AND LATINIZATION 
• David A. Badillo, Lehman College 
THE WRECKS OF THE BRISTOL AND THE MEXICO 
• Arthur S. Mattson, Lynbrook Village Historian 
Comment: Margaret Lynch Brennan, New York State Education Department (retired) 

402 Transportation 
Davis Auditorium 
NEW YORK ROAD BUILDING AND THE AMERICAN STATE, 1880-1956 
• Michael R. Fein, Johnson and Wales University 
NEW YORK AND THE OPENING OF THE ERIE CANAL 
• Caroline Fuchs, Mina Reese Library/CUNY 
TOURISM’S ROLE IN BUILDING NEW YORK’S FIRST RAILROADS 
• Richard Gassan, American University of Sharjah 
Comment: Thomas Chambers, Niagara University 

403 Native Americans 
Emerson Auditorium 
CHANGING MOHAWK SETTLEMENT PATTERNS AND SUBSISTENCE STRATEGIES, 16301715 
• Kelly Hopkins, University of Houston 
THE FOUR WESTERN NATIONS OF THE IROQUOIS LEAGUE AND EUROPEAN CONTACT, 16071634 
• Jon Parmenter, Cornell University 
WAPPINGER KINSHIP ASSOCIATIONS: DANIEL NIMHAM’S FAMILY TREE 
• J. Michael Smith, Independent Scholar 
Comment: Lawrence Hauptman, SUNY New Paltz 

404 Religion 
Bolton 280 
CONVERSION AS PROCESS: CATHERINE LIVINGSTON GARRETTSON’S SEARCH FOR SANCTIFICATION 
• Rachel Cope, Syracuse University 
THE SING SING CAMP MEETINGS 
• John W. Fried, Columbia University 
THE SISTERS OF CHARITY: NAVIGATING POLITICS AND GENDER ALONG THE HUDSON 
• Sara Dwyer McNulty, Marist College 
Comment: Eric Roth, Huguenot Historical Association 

12:00–1:30 Lunch

Wendell Tripp Lecture 

Martin Bruegel Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France 
An Acceptable Refreshment: Eating and Drinking in the Hudson Valley, 1780-1860 
Murray-Aikins Dining Hall, Second Floor

1:30–2:45 Early Afternoon Sessions

501 Recreation
Gannett 
THE DEVELOPMENT OF SALTWATER RECREATIONAL FISHING ON LONG ISLAND 
• Elizabeth Pillsbury, Columbia University 
FISHING AND HUNTING NEW YORK CITY’S CATSKILL WATERS AND LANDS 
• David Soll, Brandeis University 
Comment: Edythe Ann Quinn, Hartwick College 

502 Alcohol
Davis 
IROQUOIS TEMPERANCE SOCIETIES: FACING MODERNITY 
• Thomas J. Lappas, 
Nazareth College 
RUM RUNNING/BOOTLEGGING GUIDE TO MANHATTAN, 1920-33 
• Ellen McKenzie Lawson, Independent Scholar 
Comment: Denis Foley, SUNY Institute of Technology

503 Books
Emerson 
WHY MATHEW CAREY CHOSE NEW YORK CITY FOR THE FIRST AMERICAN BOOK FAIR 
• Melissa Hancock, Independent Scholar 
CRAFTING AUTHORITY: CHANCELLOR KENT AND HIS LIBRARY 
• Daniel Hulsebosch, New York University School of Law 
Comment: Nicholas Westbrook, Fort Ticonderoga 

504 Weeksville: Black and Green, Two Centuries of Sustainability 
Bolton 280 
WEEKSVILLE: A HISTORY OF SANCTUARY, SELF-DETERMINISM, INDEPENDENCE AND ACTIVISM 
• Jennifer Scott, Weeksville Heritage Center 
GREEN WEEKSVILLE 
• Elissa Blount Moorhead, Weeksville Heritage Center 
Comment: David Stradling, University of Cincinnati 

2:45—3:15 Break 

3:15–4:30 Mid Afternoon Sessions

601 Seventeenth Century New York
Gannett
THE ENGLISHMEN WHO SIGNED PELL’S 1654 “TREATY”
•Blake A. Bell, Pelham Town Historian
WHY DID THE ENGLISH CAPTURE NEW NETHERLAND?
•Megan Lindsay, Yale University
Comment: Dennis Maika, Fox Lane High School 

602 African Americans
Davis 
LYDIA THOMPSON AND HER BRITISH BLONDES: CROSS-DRESSING, CELEBRITY AND STALKING IN GILDED AGE NEW YORK 
• Susan Ingalls Lewis, SUNY New Paltz 
• Morgan Gwenwald, SUNY New Paltz 
PAUL LAWRENCE DUNBAR: NEW YORKER
•Reynolds J. Scott Childress, SUNY New Paltz 
Comment: Myra B. Young Armstead, Bard College

603 Industrial Archaeology as Method 
Emerson 
USING INDUSTRIAL ARCHAEOLOGY TO UNDERSTAND COMMUNITY HISTORY 
• Peter Stott, Massachusetts Historical Commission 
Comment: Edward Knoblauch, Empire State College 

4:30—4:45 Break 

4:45–5:30 Individual Presentations 

701 Gerrit Smith as Father and Son
Gannett
• Kevin Tanner, SUNY Binghamton
Comment: Hadley Kruczek Aaron, SUNY Potsdam

702 The Murder Trial that Nearly Redrew the Map of New York City
Davis
• Michael Miscione, Manhattan Borough Historian
Comment: Blake Bell, Pelham Town Historian

703 Shtetl on the Mohawk: Jews of Schenectady
Emerson
•Harvey Strum, Sage College of Albany
Comment: Amy Godine, Independent Scholar

5:30 Reception

6:30 Dinner

Murray-Aikins Dining Hall, Second Floor

8:00 Guest Speaker

Gannett Auditorium
Keynote Speaker
Kevin Baker

The author of Dreamland, Paradise Alley, and Sometimes You See It Coming will speak about New York State history in his books.

Sponsored by New York Council for the Humanities

Saturday June 7

8:00–11:45AM—Registration Palamountain Lobby 

8:30–9:45 Early Morning Sessions 

801 The Revolutionary War
Gannett 
THE 1776-77 NORTHERN CAMPAIGN AND THEIR SEQUEL: CONTEMPORARY GERMAN MAPS 
• Thomas M. Barker, Independent Scholar • Paul R. Huey, Bureau of Historic Sites, NYSOPRHP 
THE VIEW FROM FORT GOLGOTHA: LOSING THE HEARTS AND MINDS OF LONG ISLANDERS DURING THE BRITISH OCCUPATION 
• Frank P. Mann, Syracuse University 
Comment: John Smith, Texas A&M University 

802 Environmentalism 
Davis 
BUILDING THE ENVIRONMENTAL MOVEMENT IN THE HUDSON VALLEY 
• David Stradling, University of Cincinnati 
CONTEXTUALIZING THE ADIRONDACK WIND ENERGY PARK DEBATE 
• Erica A. Morin, Purdue University 
Comment: Tom Lewis, Skidmore College

803 Industrial Revolution 
Emerson 
THE FULTON-LIVINGSTON PARTNERSHIP AND BUSINESS COMPETITION 
• Thomas H. Cox, Sam Houston State University 
FROM THE EARTH TO THE MOON: THE WEST POINT FOUNDRY 
• Jessica DuLong, Independent Scholar 
Comment: Robert W. Arnold, New York State Archives (retired) 

9:45—10:00 Break

10:00–11:45 Late Morning Sessions

901 Using the Rockefeller Archives for Social History
Gannett 
WHITE SLAVERY, JDR JR., AND THE LANDMARK FILM, TRAFFIC IN SOULS (1913) 
• Carol Radovich, Rockefeller Archive Center 
PAYROLL VOUCHERS, GENEALOGY AND THE WORLD OF WORK ON THE ROCKEFELLER ESTATES 
• Charlotte Sturm, Rockefeller Archive Center 
DOING BUSINESS WITH THE ROCKEFELLERS 
• Ken Rose, Rockefeller Archive Center 
Comment: Jim Folts, New York State Archives 

902 Military
Davis 
THE NEW YORK NATIONAL GUARD ON THE SOUTHERN BORDER, 1916-1917 
• William F. Howard, New York State Naval Militia 
MOBILIZING THE NEW YORK NATIONAL GUARD IN SUPPORT OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES, 1871-1945 
• Gary Mitchell, Independent Scholar 
BUFFALO AND THE “MILITIA DRAFT” OF 1862 
• M. Stephen Pendleton, Buffalo State College 
Comment: Michael Aikey, New York State Military Museum

903 Mapping Haute Culture in Early New York: Three Perspectives on Cultural Change
Emerson 
THE EXASPERATED ALMANAC MAKER 
• Sara S. Gronim, Long Island University 
THE CITY ON STAGE 
• Bryan Waterman, New York University 
GABLE ENDS, OLYKOEKS, AND OTHER SYMPTOMS OF THE DUTCH CRAZE 
• Elizabeth Bradley, New York Public Library 
Comment: Peter Eisenstadt, Independent Scholar 

11:45–1:00 Lunch 

Murray-Aikins Dining Hall, Second Floor
Speaker: Hallie E. Bond, Adirondack Museum
Dog Days in the Adirondacks

1:15 Ticonderoga Tour

Speaker: Joseph W. Zarzynski, Bateaux Below, Inc. 
Lake George’s Sunken Fleet of 1758 and Its Role in the French and Indian War

Join us for a behind the scenes visit to one of North America’s most important points of conflict, a battleground during both the French and Indian and Revolutionary wars. 
A walking tour of the Carillon Battlefield will be followed by two options, resources at Fort Ticonderoga for studying the French and Indian War, and construction and destruction of Carillon/Fort Ticonderoga, 1755-59. 
The afternoon ends with a picnic dinner overlooking the majestic Champlain Valley. 


2008 Conference Information

Accommodations
Campus rooms are available at $67 per person per night, full breakfast included, in Wiecking Hall. Recently renovated and fully air-conditioned, the rooms have one twin bed, with bathrooms nearby. Couples may request a room with two twin beds. 
There are 11 hotels, 17 motels, and 14 bed and breakfasts within city limits. A list can be found at http://www.saratoga.org  The Inn at Saratoga (583-1890) is the oldest hotel building standing, but luxuriously updated; it is holding ten rooms until April 30 at $139 for a double. The Downtowner (584-6160) is the most centrally located, and offers doubles at $129. The Adelphi (5874688) is a beautifully restored High Victorian hotel. All three are on Broadway and the trolley shuttle stops across the street and goes direct to Skidmore College. 
For lower-priced lodging, US Route 9 both north and south (bypassed by the Northway) has affordable older motels, with prices in the $50-75 range for single/double. Among these are Cocca’s (587-1000), Locust Grove (587-3778), Golden (584-6789), Birches (584-1484) and Hideaway (306-4868) motels. 
(All telephone numbers are Area Code 518) 

Getting There
Automobile 
From the south and west, take Interstate 87 to Exit 13N, proceed five miles north on US Route 9, passing through the Saratoga Springs business district and keeping left to go straight up North Broadway; the college’s main gate is on the left at the end of the street a mile from the city center. From the north, take Exit 15, bearing right to the third traffic light at East Avenue, turn right, then right on North Broadway to the college. 
Railroad 
The Adirondack leaves New York Penn Station at 8:15 AM, arriving at 11:47 AM. The Ethan Allen leaves New York Penn Station at 2:45 PM, arriving at 6:17 PM. 
Bus 
A Trailways bus leaves New York Port Authority at 7:00, 8:30, 10:15 and 11:15 AM, and 4:30 and 5:30 PM, arriving at the Saratoga Springs railroad station. 
Local Transportation 
Taxicabs meet trains and buses; the basic fare is $4.20 from station to college. Bus 472 leaves the station at :05 past each hour; transfer at Broadway and Lake to bus 473, leaving at :15 and :45 for Case Center at Skidmore College. The fare is $1 for each bus. 

General Campus and City Information 
See the Special Programs website at cms.skidmore.edu/odsp/directions.cfm  

Exhibition Hall 
As usual, the exhibits hall on Friday will be packed with publishers, book dealers, and organizations eager to tell you about their products or services, as well as the following featured exhibits: 
• Samuel Hayden Sexton and the Lost Giles F. Yates Sketch 
Ona Curran, Schenectady County Historical Society Laura Lee Linder, First Reformed Church of Schenectady 
• The Dutch Farm Survey: Exploring Your Own Backyard 
Dutch Barn Preservation Society 
• The Restoration of the Knickerbocker Mansion 
Knickerbocker Historical Society 

In-Service Credit 
The New York State Historical Association is pleased to offer continuing education unit (C.E.U.) credits for teachers. If you are interested in receiving C.E.U., please inquire at the registration desk. 

Registration Form


 

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